Diet and nutrition


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For people with chronic kidney disease (CKD), following a kidney disease diet may be part of their treatment for maintaining good health. The kidney disease diet is generally based on eating high quality proteins and lowering phosphorus, potassium and sodium intake. The kidney diet is an individualized eating plan and can change depending on your stage of kidney disease. Find out the basics of a kidney disease diet.  



Article 1

Cranberries and cranberry juice have been rumored to promote kidney health. Urinary tract infections (UTIs) send millions of people to their doctors every year. Research supports that cranberry juice can help fight urinary tract infections, so cranberries help promote kidney health along with providing other health benefits.



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When it comes to kidney health, it pays to eat foods high in antioxidants and other properties that support good health. Here are 15 super foods to include in your kidney-friendly diet. 



What a renal dietitian can do for a person with kidney disease

Dialysis patients are assigned a renal dietitian to help them eat properly. However, people with kidney disease who are not on dialysis can also benefit from a dietitian’s expertise. Learn what a renal dietitian can do if you have kidney disease and why you may need one to help you learn about and manage a kidney diet.


Phosphorus and early stage kidney disease

Phosphorus is found in every cell of the body. It keeps your bones and teeth strong, and regulates the heart, nerves and kidneys. But when you have kidney disease, limiting phosphorus in your diet can help keep you healthier. Learn why controlling phosphorus is important for people with early stage kidney disease, which foods are low in phosphorus and which foods are high in phosphorus.


Potassium and early stage kidney disease

Potassium is an important mineral that regulates heartbeats and promotes muscle movement. But when you have advanced stage kidney disease, the kidneys may not be able to remove excess potassium, which can be harmful to the body. You will need to lower the potassium in your diet when your kidneys can no longer remove excess amounts help keep blood levels of potassium normal. Learn about potassium and how your stage of chronic kidney disease may affect your potassium level, high potassium and low potassium foods and where your potassium level should be when you have early stage kidney disease.


Protein and early stage kidney disease

Protein is an essential nutrient that helps keep your body healthy. But too much protein for people with early stage kidney disease may contribute to progressive loss of kidney function. On the other hand, inadequate protein intake causes malnutrition. People with kidney disease should monitor the amount of protein they eat on a kidney diet, and can do so with the help of their renal dietitian.


Sodium and early stage kidney disease

Sodium, sometimes known as salt, is a necessary mineral in a healthy diet. However, too much sodium can result in high blood pressure, the second leading cause of kidney disease. Reducing the salt in your diet is the first step to taking control of your early stage kidney disease. Learn about sodium, how it affects people with kidney disease and what a dietitian can do to help you learn about a low-sodium, kidney-friendly diet.


Health tools

DaVita Diet Helper

Need help sticking to the kidney diet? DaVita Diet Helper can help.
DaVita.com/DietHelper »

GFR Calculator

Learn about the stages of kidney disease with our easy-to-use GFR calculator, store results and track a GFR over time.
DaVita.com/GFR »

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